DESIGNILLUSTRATION

Oakley

Sunglasses

Oakley

Sunglasses

- Artist Series -

Oakley was started by J Jannard in 1975 in his garage with an initial investment of $300. The name "Oakley" came from Jim's English Setter, "Oakley Anne". The first Oakley sunglasses; Factory Pilot Eyeshades, were sport-oriented, resembling goggles and were released in 1984. These were followed in 1985 by the Oakley Frogskin, a casual sunglass style that was made in Japan.

 

I created a design that was based on my painting techniques but converting the ethos to a digital processes. This would rely on printing process to receate a layered look and feel which was intended to resemble a painting - but in an intentionally flat and graphic fashion.

Brand

Oakley

 

Brief

Sunglasses product design and packaging design

 

Tools

Hand-Rendered Adobe Photoshop & Adobe Illustrator

...Oakley sunglasses would ultimately be borne from an augmented pair of Oakley goggles tweaked to look slightly less like goggles...

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INITIAL

CONCEPTS

The approach to the illustration was largely inspired by the research I had done on the other Artist Series’ entries as well as other street art fashion illustration collaboration pieces for brands such as  Carhartt, Nike etc.

 

I initially drew the image up on bristol board and then inked by hand with a dip pen and india ink. From there, the piece was scanned the illustration into the computer where it was coloured using abstract vector shapes to describe the planes.

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SUNGLASSES

PROCESS

On the sunglasses themselves I used  dual colour concept with Blue one the left leg and red on the right. The letters of the colours were to represent the side of the glasses - blue for left and red for right.

 

I initially drew the image up on bristol board and then inked by hand with a dip pen and indian ink. From there I scanned the illustration into the computer where I coloured using abstract vector shapes to describe the planes.

 

The sunglasses bag, was a direct repeat of the box work - which was the way in which seemed to be the norm so I decided to follow that trend.

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PACKAGING

PROCESS

The colouring technique employed the use of abstract shades of colour (white) which was set at various transparency levels in Adobe Photoshop which, when layered on top of each other, would build up to give the impression of depth.

 

The design that I entered centred around the idea of my painted work as a wearable piece or art. My intention was that the box was to be kept as an ornamental piece that could be displayed on a shelf.

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MICROBAG

PROCESS

The colouring technique employed the use of abstract shades of colour (white) which was set at various transparency levels in Adobe Photoshop which, when layered on top of each other, would build up to give the impression of depth.

 

The design that I entered centred around the idea of my painted work as a wearable piece or art. My intention was that the box was to be kept as an ornamental piece that could be displayed on a shelf.

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FINAL

PRODUCTION

The colouring technique employed the use of abstract shades of colour (white) which was set at various transparency levels in Adobe Photoshop which, when layered on top of each other, would build up to give the impression of depth.

 

The design that I entered centred around the idea of my painted work as a wearable piece or art. My intention was that the box was to be kept as an ornamental piece that could be displayed on a shelf.

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